Articles about ‘Discrimination’

Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work or School

  • July 16, 2018
  • David Baker
  • Comments Off on Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work or School

The public attention being paid to high profile persons subjected to sexual violence and harassment has encouraged persons in lower waged positions with comparable experiences to speak up,  seek support from co-workers and  unions and exercise their rights to justice so they are not doubly violated.

A new book called  In a Day’s Work: The Fight to End Sexual Violence Against America’s Most Vulnerable Workers, by Bernice Yeung is reviewed in the July 2018 New York Review of Books by Alissa Quart and Barbara Erenreich  http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/07/19/workplace-violence-sisters-in-arms/  (link) The reviewers state:

#MeToo has too often ignored the most frequent victims of abuse, however, such as waitresses or hotel housekeepers. » Read the rest

Client wins landmark award of $200,000 for sexual assault

  • March 1, 2018
  • Kimberly Srivastava
  • Comments Off on Client wins landmark award of $200,000 for sexual assault

9 years ago, our client filed an HRTO application detailing how she had been sexually assaulted, solicited, threatened, and harassed in her workplace and in her home. The assaults were perpetrated by her boss who was also her landlord. It was a long journey, but earlier this year we welcomed the Tribunal’s decision affirming the discrimination and pattern of victimization she experienced. » Read the rest

Canadian Transportation Agency rejects Via Rail’s efforts to limit wheelchair, mobility access on trains

  • November 16, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Canadian Transportation Agency rejects Via Rail’s efforts to limit wheelchair, mobility access on trains

Bakerlaw clients, Martin Anderson and Marie Murphy, continue their fight for increased capacity  for mobility aids on Via Rail trains.

The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) is rejecting Via Rail’s efforts to limit access on its trains for passengers using wheelchairs and other mobility aids. The national rail provider has been actively resisting a previous Agency ruling dictating that all trains coast to coast must double their capacity to accommodate mobility aids and create two tie-down spots for the devices. » Read the rest

McCreath v. Victoria Taxi (1987) Ltd., 2017 BCCA 342 – Blind British Columbia man loses discrimination case against taxi company

  • October 16, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on McCreath v. Victoria Taxi (1987) Ltd., 2017 BCCA 342 – Blind British Columbia man loses discrimination case against taxi company

In a unanimous ruling on October 6, 2017, a panel of the British Columbia Court of Appeal held that Graeme McCreath, a blind man, was not discriminated against when he and his guide dog, Adrienne, were refused a taxi ride in 2014. Mr. McCreath was refused a ride by a Victoria Taxi cab driver who said he could not allow dogs in his car due to his allergies. » Read the rest

Stewart v Elk Valley Coal Corp. Summary: SCC Reaffirms Test for Discrimination but Gives a Narrow Understanding of Addiction

  • June 27, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Stewart v Elk Valley Coal Corp. Summary: SCC Reaffirms Test for Discrimination but Gives a Narrow Understanding of Addiction

On June 15, 2017, the Supreme Court of Canada handed down its decision in the case of Stewart v Elk Valley Coal Corp., 2017 SCC 30.  The majority judgment affirmed the current framework for determining whether discrimination has occurred. However, bakerlaw is concerned that the majority decision could have a chilling effect on individuals suffering from an addiction, as the Court’s ruling hinged on a very narrow understanding of addiction, which impacted its decision on whether in this case, drug dependence was a factor in the termination of employment. » Read the rest

Along for the Ride

  • March 10, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Along for the Ride

The TTC has announced that it will be changing its Wheel-Trans eligibility. These changes will expand the scope of services offered to include persons with sensory, mental-health or cognitive disabilities.

ARCH argued that this very expansion should have occurred in 1999, and the failure to do so was discriminatory. You can read about that case here (link). » Read the rest

Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Passes in Parliament

  • March 10, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Passes in Parliament

Bill S-201-the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act was passed by Parliament this week. This Act seeks to prevent persons from being compelled to undergo genetic testing and to protect the results of genetic testing from disclosure. You can read more about the Act here (link).

You can read more about genetic discrimination as a legal issue in our previous blog post here (link). » Read the rest

Age Discrimination in Employment in the Post Mandatory Retirement Era

  • October 14, 2015
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Age Discrimination in Employment in the Post Mandatory Retirement Era

On October 16, 2015, David Baker will be speaking at the Toronto Reference Library on age discrimination in employment in the post-mandatory retirement era.

The event is free and will be from 1 – 2 pm in the Beeton Auditorium at the Toronto Reference Library (789 Yonge Street). For more information regarding the event, click here (link to event). » Read the rest

Student Loans a Major Source of Discrimination Against Post-Secondary Students with Disabilities

  • July 16, 2014
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Student Loans a Major Source of Discrimination Against Post-Secondary Students with Disabilities

Toronto, ON, July 16, 2014 – Students with disabilities have significantly higher costs when attending post-secondary colleges and universities.  What is less well understood is that many students with disabilities are also burdened with significantly higher student debt to repay after leaving school.

Studies show student debt is a major concern for all post-secondary students, but debt is particularly onerous for students with disabilities who consequently require more time to complete their degree or diploma.  » Read the rest

Devaluation of Persons with Disabilities Most Evident: The Case of Emergency Preparedness

  • April 11, 2014
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Devaluation of Persons with Disabilities Most Evident: The Case of Emergency Preparedness

Toronto, ON, April 11, 2014 – I once heard Catherine Frazee speak at OISE about the ways Ontario’s emergency measures planning is based on an assumption that persons with disabilities are expendable.

The maritime code traditionally held that when grabbing life jackets or boarding life boats it was to be “women and children first.” As Catherine persuasively demonstrated, when it comes to emergency preparedness in Ontario the code provides that highest priority is to be given to the non-disabled.  » Read the rest

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