Articles about ‘disability rights’

The Gabriel Award Goes to the film ‘I Go Forward’, Depicting Justin Clark’s Story

  • May 24, 2019
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on The Gabriel Award Goes to the film ‘I Go Forward’, Depicting Justin Clark’s Story

The Gabriel Award, sponsored by The Catholic Academy of Communication Professionals, is awarded to films that convey “the worthiness of individuals while honoring the beauty of the human spirit.” For more information about the award, please visit their website here (link). This year, I Go Forward by David Gutnick is the recipient of this prestigious award and has been recognized in the General Excellence category. » Read the rest

Laurie Beachell to serve on Canada Revenue Agency’s Disability Advisory Committee

Bakerlaw congratulates Laurie Beachell on his selection for the Canada Revenue Agency’s Disability Advisory Committee (DAC). The DAC will serve as a forum for persons with disabilities to communicate their perspectives to the Canada Revenue Agency as it works to revise the way it administers the tax measures designed to support people with disabilities. » Read the rest

Liberals to scrap policy that rejects sick, disabled immigrants

  • November 27, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Liberals to scrap policy that rejects sick, disabled immigrants

“Canada is committed to ditching a policy that rejects immigrants because they’re sick or disabled and could be a drag on the health system, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says.

Calling it an “important and sensitive” issue, Hussen said the government will look at all options to revamp the 40-year-old policy, which bars entry to applicants when they could be costly to public health or social service systems. » Read the rest

Canadian Transportation Agency rejects Via Rail’s efforts to limit wheelchair, mobility access on trains

  • November 16, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Canadian Transportation Agency rejects Via Rail’s efforts to limit wheelchair, mobility access on trains

Bakerlaw clients, Martin Anderson and Marie Murphy, continue their fight for increased capacity  for mobility aids on Via Rail trains.

The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) is rejecting Via Rail’s efforts to limit access on its trains for passengers using wheelchairs and other mobility aids. The national rail provider has been actively resisting a previous Agency ruling dictating that all trains coast to coast must double their capacity to accommodate mobility aids and create two tie-down spots for the devices. » Read the rest

People with episodic disabilities in Canada: Who are they and what supports do they need to obtain and retain employment?

  • November 12, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on People with episodic disabilities in Canada: Who are they and what supports do they need to obtain and retain employment?

The research study entitled, Episodic Disabilities in Canada – People with episodic disabilities in Canada: Who are they and what supports do they need to obtain and retain employment?,  provides important analysis and research to assist people with episodic disabilities in pursuing human rights applications.

The full paper is available here (link). » Read the rest

New federal legislation promises support for caregivers of people with disabilities

  • October 25, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on New federal legislation promises support for caregivers of people with disabilities

The federal minister responsible for crafting Canada’s first national accessibility legislation, Kent Hehr, says the new law should be ready by Spring 2018, and should benefit not only people with disabilities, but their caregivers as well.

Read the full article, Canada’s first national accessibility law should be ready by next spring: Hehr, by Michelle McGuigge of the Canadian Press HERE (link). » Read the rest

David Baker reviews the new book, “Disabling Barriers: Social Movements, Disability History, and the Law”, edited by Ravi Malhotra and Benjamin Isitt

  • October 20, 2017
  • David Baker
  • Comments Off on David Baker reviews the new book, “Disabling Barriers: Social Movements, Disability History, and the Law”, edited by Ravi Malhotra and Benjamin Isitt

Review (click HERE for the PDF version)

Disabling Barriers: Social Movements, Disability History, and the Law, ed. Ravi Malhotra and Benjamin Isitt

UBC Press, $32.95

The two editors of this valuable new addition to the small but growing literature on the law, history and politics of disability in Canada is most welcome. » Read the rest

Ontario family launches human rights complaint over access to therapy for son with autism

  • October 16, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Ontario family launches human rights complaint over access to therapy for son with autism

Bakerlaw attended the first two days of hearing at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on October 12-13, 2017 on behalf of the Skrt family, advocating for Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) for students with autism in publicly funded schools.

The Applicant’s Opening Statement is available here (link).

Media coverage of the case is available here (link). » Read the rest

Communications and Disability Rights: How Litigation before the CRTC Can Make a Difference

  • July 11, 2014
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Communications and Disability Rights: How Litigation before the CRTC Can Make a Difference

This summer, Bakerlaw is pleased to host Julia Munk, Osgoode Hall Law School’s 2014 Kreppner Plater Fellowship winner. Julia is researching how effective advocacy before the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) can make gains for the rights of persons with disabilities generally. Bakerlaw will feature some of Julia’s work on the website over the summer, beginning with her first blog post on the historical development of telecommunications regulation and successful advocacy before the CRTC – by both lawyers and non-lawyers – in favour of disability rights:

Telecommunications Makes Canada a Nation and Access Makes Its Citizens

Telecommunications has played a distinct role in Canada’s national development. » Read the rest

Devaluation of Persons with Disabilities Most Evident: The Case of Emergency Preparedness

  • April 11, 2014
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Devaluation of Persons with Disabilities Most Evident: The Case of Emergency Preparedness

Toronto, ON, April 11, 2014 – I once heard Catherine Frazee speak at OISE about the ways Ontario’s emergency measures planning is based on an assumption that persons with disabilities are expendable.

The maritime code traditionally held that when grabbing life jackets or boarding life boats it was to be “women and children first.” As Catherine persuasively demonstrated, when it comes to emergency preparedness in Ontario the code provides that highest priority is to be given to the non-disabled.  » Read the rest

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