Access to Justice

New changes to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board as of October 1, 2019

  • September 27, 2019
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on New changes to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board as of October 1, 2019

The Government of Ontario announced plans to enhance the Victim Quick Response Program (VQRP) to replace the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board (CICB). The program will be known as the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+), which builds on the existing VQRP program by making it easier for victims and their families to access services and supports and getting them support faster. » Read the rest

Unbundling legal services

  • August 22, 2019
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Unbundling legal services

The Law Society of Ontario (formerly the Law Society of Upper Canada) published an article related to professional obligations regarding unbundling legal services. You can read this article here (link).

Unbundling legal services are limited scope retainers whereby the client and their attorney agree to limit the scope of the attorney’s involvement in the legal matter. » Read the rest

Clear line drawn on appropriate judicial and adjudicator activity in support of equality seeking groups: engaging with politicians and trying to persuade them to reach specific policy outcomes

  • April 16, 2019
  • Anoop Kalsi
  • Comments Off on Clear line drawn on appropriate judicial and adjudicator activity in support of equality seeking groups: engaging with politicians and trying to persuade them to reach specific policy outcomes

On December 20, 2018, the Ontario Judicial Counsel handed down a decision clearing the Honourable Justice Donald McLeod of judicial misconduct.

A finding of judicial misconduct can only be made where any breach of the standards of judicial conduct by the judge was “so seriously contrary to impartiality, integrity and independence of the judiciary that it has undermined the public’s confidence in the judge’s ability to perform the duties of office or in the administration of justice generally.” » Read the rest

Students and Alumni Rally Against University of Toronto Law Tuition

  • December 11, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Students and Alumni Rally Against University of Toronto Law Tuition

Current and former University of Toronto law students are frustrated about rising tuition costs, which are driving students into greater debt and reducing socioeconomic diversity in the profession.

David Baker, who has advocated on behalf of alumni against rising, prohibitive tuition costs, was recently featured in an article by Anita Balakrishnan in the Law Times, entitled “Alumni, students decry U of T’s law school fees”, which can be read here (link). » Read the rest

LSO Calls for Comment on New Access to Justice Initiative

  • November 28, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on LSO Calls for Comment on New Access to Justice Initiative

The Law Society of Ontario (“LSO”) is soliciting comments on a draft regulatory framework that would allow lawyers and paralegals to provide legal services to the clients of registered civil society organization – at no cost to the clients of those organizations. » Read the rest

Another Blow to Access to Justice in Canada

  • October 25, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Another Blow to Access to Justice in Canada

The Conversation has recently published an article by Doug Ferguson and Jason H. Voss entitled “How a proposed law could cut off legal aid for low-income people”.

The article discusses Bill C-75, a federal bill currently before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. » Read the rest

The Ontario Human Rights Commission is hosting a FREE training on its new policy on Accessible Education for Students with Disabilities

  • October 12, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on The Ontario Human Rights Commission is hosting a FREE training on its new policy on Accessible Education for Students with Disabilities

The policy addresses continued barriers to education that students face at all levels of the education system, including:

  • inaccessible build environments
  • inadequate resources and supports in the classroom
  • long waiting lists for professional assessments
  • inappropriate requests by educational institutions for medical information
  • denial of disability-related accommodations
  • persistent negative attitudes and stereotypes towards people with disabilities
  • ineffective dispute resolution processes

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, students with disabilities have the right to meaningful access to education comparable with their peers, and with accommodations commensurate with their needs. » Read the rest

Update: Charities can sponsor Test Case litigation

  • August 21, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Update: Charities can sponsor Test Case litigation

Bakerlaw recently posted about the Ontario Superior Court of Justice’s decision in Canada Without Poverty v AG Canada, 2018 ONSC 4147, in which the Court struck down a prohibition in the Income Tax Act preventing registered charities from devoting more than 10% of their resources to “political activities”. » Read the rest

Charities can sponsor Test Case litigation

  • July 31, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Charities can sponsor Test Case litigation

On July 16th, 2018, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice struck down a prohibition in the Income Tax Act preventing registered charities from devoting more than 10% of their resources to “political activities”. This welcome decision paves the way for registered charities to sponsor advocacy that may previously have been limited as “political”, including “test case” litigation. » Read the rest

Liberals to scrap policy that rejects sick, disabled immigrants

  • November 27, 2017
  • BakerLaw
  • Comments Off on Liberals to scrap policy that rejects sick, disabled immigrants

“Canada is committed to ditching a policy that rejects immigrants because they’re sick or disabled and could be a drag on the health system, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says.

Calling it an “important and sensitive” issue, Hussen said the government will look at all options to revamp the 40-year-old policy, which bars entry to applicants when they could be costly to public health or social service systems. » Read the rest

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