Articles written by Laura Lepine

HSARB Orders Increased Nursing Hours, Recognizing the Risk of Parental Burnout

  • May 2, 2019
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on HSARB Orders Increased Nursing Hours, Recognizing the Risk of Parental Burnout

On January 10th, 2019 the Health Services Appeal and Review Board (“HSARB”) released its decision in the case of K.H. v Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. K.H., a 9-year-old girl, has a condition called short bowel syndrome. Her conditions necessitates the overnight administration of intravenous nutrition, among other things. During the night, there is a risk of her intravenous line malfunctioning and needing to be fixed. » Read the rest

Class action certified for government negligence in abandoning 18 year old disabled people at the bottom of adult waitlists

  • March 11, 2019
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Class action certified for government negligence in abandoning 18 year old disabled people at the bottom of adult waitlists

On December 14th, 2018, Justice Edward P. Belobaba of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, certified a class action proceeding brought by the father of a disabled person, Briana Leroux. Briana is 20 years old and has a rare brain disorder; she will need constant care for her whole life.

Until she turned 18, Briana received services via the Ministry of Children and Youth Services (“MCYS”). » Read the rest

David Lepofsky, Disability Organizations Call on Federal Government to Improve Bill C-81

  • February 26, 2019
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on David Lepofsky, Disability Organizations Call on Federal Government to Improve Bill C-81

On January 9th, 2019, the Chair of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance (“AODA Alliance”), David Lepofsky, sat down with CTV “Your Morning” host Kelsey McEwen to discuss the federal government’s Bill C-81, the proposed Accessible Canada Act.

Since the bill’s inception, the federal government has stated it is meant to reflect the principle “nothing about us without us!” However, disability groups including the AODA Alliance are calling foul. » Read the rest

Ministry of Education Gaining Power to Establish Service Animal Guidelines

  • December 21, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Ministry of Education Gaining Power to Establish Service Animal Guidelines

The Ontario Ministry of Education has recently introduced Bill 48, the “Safe and Supportive Classrooms Act, 2018”, which mandates revocation of a teacher’s teaching certificate if he or she is guilty of professional misconduct involving sexual abuse of a child.

One provision of Bill 48, however, seems unrelated: Schedule 2 of the Bill would amend subsection 8(1) of the Education Act, giving the Minister of Education the power to establish policies and guidelines respecting service animals in schools. » Read the rest

CHRT to Hear Complaint of Women with Service Dogs Forced off Flight

  • December 21, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on CHRT to Hear Complaint of Women with Service Dogs Forced off Flight

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (“CHRT”) will hear the complaint of two visually-impaired Toronto women who were removed from a flight at Pearson Airport because of their service dogs.

Amal Haddad, Nayla Farah, and Farah’s daughter allege that, though they had all the necessary papers and had travelled with service dogs many times before, the flight crew on their Jet Airways flight had them removed for refusing to muzzle their service dogs. » Read the rest

Students and Alumni Rally Against University of Toronto Law Tuition

  • December 11, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Students and Alumni Rally Against University of Toronto Law Tuition

Current and former University of Toronto law students are frustrated about rising tuition costs, which are driving students into greater debt and reducing socioeconomic diversity in the profession.

David Baker, who has advocated on behalf of alumni against rising, prohibitive tuition costs, was recently featured in an article by Anita Balakrishnan in the Law Times, entitled “Alumni, students decry U of T’s law school fees”, which can be read here (link). » Read the rest

Devaluing Ontarians with Intellectual Disabilities

  • November 28, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Devaluing Ontarians with Intellectual Disabilities

The Ontario government has announced a change to the Employment Standards Act that will have a significant, negative impact on Ontarians with intellectual disabilities: a delay to the end of sheltered workshops.

“Sheltered workshops” are places where people with disabilities are employed for incredibly low wages (under $2.00 per hour). Under the Employment Standards Act, sheltered workshops are excluded from the wage protections in place for other Ontario workers. » Read the rest

LSO Calls for Comment on New Access to Justice Initiative

  • November 28, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on LSO Calls for Comment on New Access to Justice Initiative

The Law Society of Ontario (“LSO”) is soliciting comments on a draft regulatory framework that would allow lawyers and paralegals to provide legal services to the clients of registered civil society organization – at no cost to the clients of those organizations.

The framework is intended to facilitate access to justice particularly for individuals who may not perceive that they have legal issues or who may face additional barriers to accessing lawyer and paralegal services, such as mobility or geographical, cultural, or linguistic factors. » Read the rest

Another Blow to Access to Justice in Canada

  • October 25, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on Another Blow to Access to Justice in Canada

The Conversation has recently published an article by Doug Ferguson and Jason H. Voss entitled “How a proposed law could cut off legal aid for low-income people”.

The article discusses Bill C-75, a federal bill currently before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. The legislation seeks to amend Canada’s Criminal Code, including by increasing the maximum penalty for all summary conviction offences from six months to two years. » Read the rest

The Ontario Human Rights Commission is hosting a FREE training on its new policy on Accessible Education for Students with Disabilities

  • October 12, 2018
  • Laura Lepine
  • Comments Off on The Ontario Human Rights Commission is hosting a FREE training on its new policy on Accessible Education for Students with Disabilities

The policy addresses continued barriers to education that students face at all levels of the education system, including:

  • inaccessible build environments
  • inadequate resources and supports in the classroom
  • long waiting lists for professional assessments
  • inappropriate requests by educational institutions for medical information
  • denial of disability-related accommodations
  • persistent negative attitudes and stereotypes towards people with disabilities
  • ineffective dispute resolution processes

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, students with disabilities have the right to meaningful access to education comparable with their peers, and with accommodations commensurate with their needs. » Read the rest

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